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Tuesday, October 15, 2019

October 15, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I am known as a Wharf Roach
I'm an isopod found by the sea
I live just above the high watermark
Crabs and shrimp are in my family.

(If you have ever wondered, Isopods get big. Really really BIG. Mae sure you watch the video.)

Sources: iNaturalist - Wharf Roach

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Monday, October 14, 2019

October 14, 2019

  Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I am known as a Snowy Egret
My leg is currently broken
Although I still can hunt and fly,
My ultimate fate will remain unspoken

(This bird was still flying and catching fish, but he was clearly in pain, you could see him kind of wince when he landed. This picture was taken from pretty far away, the bird was on the rocks and able to fly so there wasn't anything we could do to help him. As described in the article linked below, if an injured bird can fly, making any attempt to catch it will most likely result in a lot of stress on the bird and likely its death.)

Sources: Best Friends - How to Help an Injured Wild Bird

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Sunday, October 13, 2019

October 13, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I am known as a Sandwich Tern,
Look close to see my yellow-tipped bill
I also have a shaggy crest on my head
And I dive into water to eat my fill.

Sources: Cornell Lab All About Birds - Sandwich Tern

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Saturday, October 12, 2019

October 12, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I am known as a Common Tern,
I like to hover, then dive to catch fish
You can identify me by my forked tail,
Slender bill and black pointy wing tips.

Sources: Cornell Lab All About Birds - Common Tern

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Friday, October 11, 2019

October 11, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I am a type of Ribbed Barnacle
I am related to lobsters and crabs
I secrete fast-drying cement and stick to
Anything that I can grab.

(Click to read the article below, Barnacles are quite interesting. I see them on manatees that have come from salt water into the brackish, but I never really stopped to think about what Barnacles are before.)

Sources: Florida Museum - Five Facts: Barnacles

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Thursday, October 10, 2019

October 10, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I am known as a Laughing Gull
Today I'm looking a tad morose
I'm wearing my non-breeding plumage
Cause no one's clicked on my Tinder post.

(But seriously, check out the link below for a good comparison of the many different plumages of the Laughing Gull throughout it's life.)

Sources: eBird Laughing Gull Photos

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

October 9, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I'm an Atlantic Sergeant Major
I have 5 black stripes - that  is true.
But I have never served in the army
In fact, I am still in school.

Sources: Florida Museum - Discover Fishes: Abudefduf saxatilis

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

October 8, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I'm known as a Lightning Nerite
I live in the intertidal zone
That means at low tide I sit on rocks
At high tide, the water's my home.

Sources: Atlantic Seashore Field Guide: Florida to Canada - Nerita fulgurant

Capital Regional District - Intertidal Zone

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Monday, October 7, 2019

October 7, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

I'm a Little Blue Heron
This fish sure looks delectable
I'd tell you more about it
But mom says, "Don't talk with your mouth full!"

Sources: Etiquette Scholar - Bad Table Manners

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Sunday, October 6, 2019

October 6, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

These are Double-crested Cormorants,
The one on top is slightly younger.
The other one has darker feathers on his head and neck
Than the cormorant he is presently under.

Sources: Wikipedia, Double Crested Cormorants

Photo and text © 2019 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Saturday, October 5, 2019

October 5, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

These are two Ruddy Turnstones
The top one is much younger
They flip the table over before they eat
If they were human, we would call them vulgar!

Sources: Ruddy Turnstone video by Mark Vance

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Friday, October 4, 2019

October 4, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

We are Mangrove Tree Crabs
Our color varies widely
We are fast and if you try to catch us
We won't just sit by idly.

Sources: Wild South Florida - Mangrove Tree Crab

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Thursday, October 3, 2019

October 3, 2019

Location: Fort Pierce Inlet State Park

Here in front, I'm an adult Laughing Gull,
Behind me is a first year bird.
We like to eat insects, crustaceans, and...
Heck, we eat everything, even earth worms.

Winners of yesterday's contest were Cindy V. and Joy H., both of whom submitted the correct answer, Double Crested Cormorant at exactly 11:19. Cindy, drop me an email with your snail mail calendar and I'll get that right off to  you.

Sources: Cornell Lab All About Birds Laughing Gull

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

October 2, 2019

Location: Jetty Park, Fort Pierce

Can you guess who I am?
Here are a couple of clues:
I only live up to my name during breeding season
And the inside of my mouth is bright blue.

(The first reader who either replies here or sends me an email with the correct name of the bird will receive a free Dee at 8:00 a.m. 2020 Nature of Indian River Wall Calendar.)

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

October 1, 2019

Location: Fort Pierce Inlet State Park

This is known as Rougeplant,
Birds and animals eat its seeds
Historically women made themselves pretty
Wearing rouge made from the berries.

(Note to readers who subscribe via email: As of today, you will start receiving the daily post at 8:00 a.m. on the day on which it is posted. If you missed the September 30th blog during this transition, you can read it by clicking this link.)

Sources: Florida Native Plant Society - Rivina humilis

Photo and text © 2018 Dee Fairbanks Simpson